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In the Community

Bruce Power donates $5,000 to Walkerton Fire Department for off-road vehicle

Bruce Power donated $5,000 to the Walkerton Firefighters Association, which is raising money for an off-road utility vehicle. The vehicle will enable access to emergency situations that occur in rural or off-road areas for the department.  It will service the Municipality of Brockton, and will also be available to respond to neighboring municipalities via the Bruce County Fire Mutual Aid Program. Pictured is Chris Wilson, left, Firefighter, Mike Loos, Acting Captain, Dwight Irwin, Bruce Power Community Investment and Sponsorship Lead, and Dustin Stroeder, Firefighter.

Bruce Power donated $5,000 to the Walkerton Firefighters Association, which is raising money for an off-road utility vehicle. The vehicle will enable access to emergency situations that occur in rural or off-road areas for the department. It will service the Municipality of Brockton, and will also be available to respond to neighboring municipalities via the Bruce County Fire Mutual Aid Program. Pictured is Chris Wilson, left, Firefighter, Mike Loos, Acting Captain, Dwight Irwin, Bruce Power Community Investment and Sponsorship Lead, and Dustin Stroeder, Firefighter.

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Bruce Power donates $5,000 to Big Brothers Big Sisters Kincardine

Bruce Power donated $5,000 the Big Brothers Big Sisters Kincardine and District for its programming for youth in the community. Kathleen Scott, of Bruce Power’s Corporate Affairs department, presented the cheque to Jennifer Hunter, BBBS Office and Community Coordinator, and Gillian Young, Mentoring Coordinator/Executive Director.

Bruce Power donated $5,000 the Big Brothers Big Sisters Kincardine and District for its programming for youth in the community. Kathleen Scott, of Bruce Power’s Corporate Affairs department, presented the cheque to Jennifer Hunter, BBBS Office and Community Coordinator, and Gillian Young, Mentoring Coordinator/Executive Director.

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Bruce Power donates $3,000 to Participation Lodge

Bruce Power recently donated $3,000 to Participation Lodge Grey/Bruce, an assisted-living facility near Holland Centre for people with special needs. The money will go toward a new 30' x 30’, two-bay steel garage to house and protect the groups two wheelchair accessible vehicles, which assist the residents in attending community events and medical appointments, by keeping the specialized vans out of the harsh winter weather. Dwight Irwin, second from left, Community Investment and Sponsorship Lead at Bruce Power, presented the cheque to Shirley Levitt, left, Acting Board President, Karen Kociuk, Resource Development Director, and Elaine Kerr, Executive Director.

Bruce Power recently donated $3,000 to Participation Lodge Grey Bruce, an assisted-living facility near Holland Centre for people with special needs. The money will go toward a new 30′ x 30’, two-bay steel garage to house and protect the groups two wheelchair accessible vehicles, which assist the residents in attending community events and medical appointments, by keeping the specialized vans out of the harsh winter weather. Dwight Irwin, second from left, Community Investment and Sponsorship Lead at Bruce Power, presented the cheque to Shirley Levitt, left, Acting Board President, Karen Kociuk, Resource Development Director, and Elaine Kerr, Executive Director. Learn more about Participation Lodge at www.participationlodge.com.

 

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Bruce Power supports Vital Signs conference

Derek Bowen, middle, Board Member and lead for Georgian Bay Forever's Science Advisory Committee, stands with Francis Chua, Bruce Power’s Manager of Environment and Sustainability, left, and Cherie-Lee Fietsch, Environmental Scientist at Bruce Power. The company was the primary sponsor of Georgian Bay Forever’s recent Vital Signs conference.

Derek Bowen, middle, Board Member and lead for Georgian Bay Forever’s Science Advisory Committee, stands with Francis Chua, Bruce Power’s Manager of Environment and Sustainability, left, and Cherie-Lee Fietsch, Environmental Scientist at Bruce Power. The company was the primary sponsor of Georgian Bay Forever’s recent Vital Signs conference.

Vital Signs is as much a report on the health of Georgian Bay as it is a morning of learning about the research Georgian Bay Forever (GBF) is conducting.

This year’s seminar – of which Bruce Power was the primary sponsor – was attended by about 100 curious bay-dwellers, who had to the opportunity to gain insight on everything from reverse-engineering food webs from the stomach contents of fish to how an outerspace view can help us understand what changes are happening in our wetlands.

Elizabeth Dowdeswell, the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, started off the morning by setting philosophical roadmap for attendees. During her keynote address, she outlined the major theme of the day: science as form of social empowerment.

“We are not individual land holders in a particular geographic part of the Great Lakes systems – our influence, our impact is so much greater,” she reminded the crowd. “You exemplify what happens when place matters to people.”

She identified three key ingredients to social change – science and technology, government and civil society. She stressed that change cannot happen unless all of three work together. One of her principle ideas was the notion of a contract between science and society, which links research to policy action and, “reconciles scientific excellence and social relevance.”

She urged GBF members to ask themselves if our science is asking the right questions and if it is being bought through the right channels of our institutions.

“From everything I’ve read and seen, I’m confident that the intellectual capital, the passion and the enlightened leadership in this room can bring a renewed sense of urgency and commitment,” she said.

Next, Dr. Robert Hanner spoke about his DNA barcoding work at the University of Guelph’s Biodiversity Institute of Ontario.

“Species is simply a hypothesis,” Dr. Hanner said, adding that time is of the essence when it comes to cataloguing species DNA. “Someone has observed some individual organisms in nature and based on some defining characteristic has tried to draw a binding box around them to identify them as a set.”

“As (our environment) goes through this time of profound change, our window of sampling to understand the biodiversity around us is rapidly closing,” he said.

A DNA barcode is a representation of the combination of DNA base pairs that makes the species unique, Dr. Hanner explained. Unlike genome projects, DNA barcode aim for ‘genic minimalism.’ “(We’re looking for) how little DNA do we need to know to tell species apart,” he clarified. “This allows us to identify species rapidly and cost-effectively.”

This technique has proven to have many uses including confirming individuals are a part of the same species, identifying new species and improving taxonomy, since some samples his team collects turn out not to have associated species name. In these cases, these specimens become known by their Barcode Index Numbers (BIN).

Barcoding is also important because it allows scientists to identify not just mature species samples but also larvae and highly processed materials, like fish fillets. The aim of Dr. Hanner’s work is to generate a barcode database that can be used worldwide, and one of the first sets of species his team started to catalogue was freshwater fish in Canada. This is the first piece in the puzzle of ultimately being able to meta-barcoding an environment (gathering all of the barcodes that exist in a single habitat).

“We want to get to a place where we can identify what species of fish are in a bay just by sampling the water,” he concluded. “I think this is what is really exciting about this technology when it comes to the Great Lakes.”

This year, GBF paired up with NASA to investigate water levels from a new perspective. Fittingly, they video-conferenced in for the morning to share their discoveries.

NASA conducts its observations of earthly changes through a network of 18 satellites in orbit.

“There are a few reasons why NASA looks at Earth Sciences,” said Mr. Favors. “One is that you need a vantage point from space to really understand the planet. This allows us to approach looking at our earth as an entire system.”

Mr. Owens then went through data collected with GBF through NASA’s Develop program, which partners organizations with NASA to conduct observational studies. The GBF-guided study examined wetland habitats along Georgian Bay.

“We have been working on this project for 20 weeks – it just concluded last week,” explained Mr. Owens. “We looked at the impact of decreasing lake water levels on the wetlands along the Great Lakes, and more specifically around Georgian Bay.”

Mr. Owens listed the reasons to look at wetlands, including their importance to ecosystems, the fact they serve as groundwater recharge points, are habitat for numerous species, are a source of tourism, can help control flooding and erosion, and, on a global scale, they act as natural carbon sinks.

What they discovered is there was a loss of wetlands along the southern and western edges of Georgian Bay from 1987 to 2013. But there was an increase in wetlands in the northern area of the Bay in that same timeframe.

“Overall for Georgian Bay from 1987 to 2013, there was a seven per cent wetland gain – mostly in the northern portion of the Bay – and a 10 per cent wetland loss mostly in the south. Meaning, overall there was a net loss of 3.8 per cent,” concluded Mr. Owens.

The final set of speakers for the day included Dr. Lewis Molot, Dr. Neil Hutchinson and Dr. Kevin McCann. Dr. Molot shared his research on algae blooms. First, he outlined the conditions needed for these toxic occurrences to happen – lots of phosphorus, low winds and warm temperatures.

He then informed the crowd that the number of reports of algae blooms by the public has increased in recent years and there are more blooms happening later in the year. Part of this could be from increased awareness, he said, but climate change may also be a factor in understanding why Georgian Bay is seeing more blooms.

Dr. Kevin McCann pulled together many themes raised by Dr. Hanner. By using DNA barcoding, Dr. McCann and his team have been able to reserve-engineer food webs from the stomach contents of aquatic creatures in the Bay. The key is to trace carbon, which is the “lifeblood of ecosystems,” he said. Once that map is complete, you get a sense of what is normal for these habitats. This, then, allows researchers to pick up on early warning signs when something is off.

Lastly, Dr. Neil Hutchinson took the floor to give an update on his paleolimnological studies of Georgian Bay. Using different sized sediment columns from different points of the floor of the Bay, Dr. Hutchinson and his team were able to not only date the age of that area but also understand its composition. These samples also shed insight into phosphorus levels, which can be a precursor to blue-green algae (the cause of the toxic blooms Mr. Molot discussed).

Together, the three panelists provided different litmus tests to understand multi-faceted, complex health of Georgian Bay.

The funding for the Vital Signs conference was provided by Bruce Power’s Environment and Sustainability Fund, which is a new, $400,000 annual fund for projects that promote the betterment of the environment.

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Bruce Power supports Inverhuron Provincial Park family programs

Bill Thorne, left, Assistant Superintendent at Inverhuron Provincial Park, receives a $1,700 cheque from Christine John and Drew Henkel, of Bruce Power’s Community Relations Department, for the Park’s fish derby and sand sculpting and castle contest, which will be held this summer. Inverhuron Provincial Park sits on three square kilometres of forested land and beachfront directly beside the Bruce Power site, and welcomes thousands of campers and day visitors each year.

Bill Thorne, left, Assistant Superintendent at Inverhuron Provincial Park, receives a $1,700 cheque from Christine John and Drew Henkel, of Bruce Power’s Community Relations Department, for the Park’s fish derby and sand sculpting and castle contest, which will be held this summer. Inverhuron Provincial Park sits on three square kilometres of forested land and beachfront directly beside the Bruce Power site, and welcomes thousands of campers and day visitors each year.

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Bruce Power donates $1,500 to Rotary Huron Shore Run

Christine John, middle, Communications Specialist at Bruce Power, present a $1,500 cheque to John and June VanBastelaar, of the Saugeen Shores Rotary Club. The money will go toward the Rotary Huron Shore Run, which is a fundraising initiative for the Saugeen Hospital Foundation. The run encourages health for individuals and personal growth, while developing a sense of community to support the Hospital Foundation.

Christine John, middle, Communications Specialist at Bruce Power, present a $1,500 cheque to John and June VanBastelaar, of the Saugeen Shores Rotary Club. The money will go toward the Rotary Huron Shore Run, which is a fundraising initiative for the Saugeen Hospital Foundation. The run encourages health for individuals and personal growth, while developing a sense of community to support the Hospital Foundation.

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Bruce Power donates $4,700 to Huron Fringe Birding Festival

Bruce Power donated $4,700 to the Huron Fringe Birding Festival, which is organized by the Friends of MacGregor Park. The festival is one of the largest in Ontario and continues to grow in popularity each year. It will be held May 22-25 and May 28-31. Visit http://friendsofmacgregor.org/page/huron-fringe-birding-festival.

Bruce Power donated $4,700 to the Huron Fringe Birding Festival, which is organized by the Friends of MacGregor Park. The festival is one of the largest in Ontario and continues to grow in popularity each year. It will be held May 22-25 and May 28-31. Visit http://friendsofmacgregor.org/page/huron-fringe-birding-festival for more information.

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Bruce Power employees raise $15,300 for Nepal relief efforts

Nicole Flippance, Communications Specialist at Bruce Power, holds the $15,300 donated by Bruce Power employees. The money will go directly to the Red Cross and its earthquake relief efforts in Nepal. The Government of Canada is matching all donations until May 25.

Nicole Flippance, Communications Specialist at Bruce Power, holds the $15,300 donated by Bruce Power employees. The money will go directly to the Red Cross and its earthquake relief efforts in Nepal. The Government of Canada is matching all donations until May 25.

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Bruce Power honours fallen and injured workers on Day of Mourning

Bruce Power marked the Day of Mourning on April 28. Some families of workers who died while building the Bruce site over 40 years ago, attended the annual ceremony.

Bruce Power marked the Day of Mourning on April 28. Some families of workers who died while building the Bruce site over 40 years ago, attended the annual ceremony.

TIVERTON, ON – April 28, 2015 – Workplace safety is everybody’s responsibility and each person on the Bruce Power site, from the shop floor to the board room, has a duty to ensure employees get home safely at night.

That was the message conveyed during an onsite ceremony marking the anniversary of the Day of Mourning, Bruce Power President and CEO Duncan Hawthorne urged all employees and union partners to never forget the people who have died or become ill in the workplace, and prevent it from happening again.

“Safety is our number one value at Bruce Power. That means every one of us has to care enough to act to ensure our workplace is safe for our colleagues,” Hawthorne said. “Our safety first culture creates a benchmark that greatly reduces the number of workplace injuries, illnesses and deaths across our site and extends to our contractors and visitors from across the province.”

The annual commemoration of the Day of Mourning on the Bruce site included members of the Grey-Bruce Labour Council, the Power Workers’ Union, The Society of Energy Professionals, the Building Trades Union, Ontario Power Generation, members of the Saugeen First Nation and family members of those who lost their lives during the construction of the Bruce site. Those who died are honoured on a memorial cairn outside Bruce Power’s corporate office.

About Bruce Power

Bruce Power operates the world’s largest operating nuclear generating facility and is the source of roughly 30 per cent of Ontario’s electricity. The company’s site in Tiverton, ON, is home to eight CANDU reactors, each one capable of generating enough low-cost, reliable, safe and clean electricity to meet the annual needs of a city the size of Hamilton. Formed in 2001, Bruce Power is an all-Canadian partnership among Borealis Infrastructure Management (a division of the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System), TransCanada, the Power Workers’ Union and the Society of Energy Professionals. A majority of Bruce Power’s employees are also owners in the business.

For further information, please contact:

John Peevers – 519-361-6583 – john.peevers@brucepower.com

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Bruce Power supports Envirothon to reconnect students with nature

Stewardship Grey Bruce and Forests Ontario held its annual Envirothon this week. Bruce Power supported the outdoor classroom project with a $1,500 donation.

Stewardship Grey Bruce and the Ministry of Natural Resources held its annual Envirothon this week. Bruce Power supported the outdoor classroom project with a $1,500 donation.

Envirothon is a high school curriculum-based outdoor education and competition event at the local level.

Envirothon gets students outdoors, to experience nature first hand and hands on. It is a unique team competition that rewards students for learning about the natural world around them. Local conservation organizations partner to provide students with interactive field trips and workshops to help them understand forests, soils, wildlife, aquatic ecosystems and the human impact on all of the things we value in nature. Envirothon uses field testing to develop critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork and communication skills.

Bruce Power donated $1,500 to the annual event.

Ontario Envirothon’s goal is “to build environmental awareness and leadership among young people through practical, hands-on educational experiences, enabling them to make informed, responsible decisions that benefit the earth and society.”

Cool weather and rain couldn't stop local students from enjoying Envirothon 2015.

Cool weather and rain couldn’t stop local students from enjoying Envirothon 2015.

The objectives are:

  • to increase students’ awareness of the natural balance and complexity of environmental ecosystems
  • to increase students’ understanding of basic science concepts in the areas of forestry, wildlife, aquatic ecology, and soil, together with a current environmental issue each year
  • to provide opportunity for students to experience differing views and concepts relative to environmental issues
  • to provide opportunity for students to experience new ideas, geography, and cultures throughout Ontario and North America

In Grey and Bruce counties, this is a partnership between the Ministry of Natural Resources and Stewardship Grey Bruce.

The winning regional team goes on to a provincial competition organized by Forests Ontario, bringing together all teams from across the province. The winning provincial team then goes on to an international competition, usually held within the U.S.

Reconnecting with nature is one of the great results of Envirothon, which Bruce Power supported with a $1,500 donation.

Reconnecting with nature is one of the great results of Envirothon, which Bruce Power supported with a $1,500 donation.

 

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